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    Give yourself a hand. In case you haven’t noticed, Daily Kos is about to turn 20, and we can’t stop talking about it or coming up with cool ways to celebrate. There’s the Koscars, and the party I’m hosting, This is My Best, and so much more to come! Some years ago, I’m told, there was a wonderful series called This Is My Best (TIMB), which encouraged Community members to share their own writing that they were most proud of, rather than the writing of others. One part self-promotion, one part self-confidence, all parts awesome, TIMB encourages writers to press pause on their role as their own worst critics and take some time to toot their own horns. So now, as Daily Kos completes its second decade and rockets into its third, I’m so excited to report that we’re bringing TIMB back. In case you missed the first installment of TIMB featuring the Community Contributors Team’s personal bests, here’s a quick recap of how it works: This is the second of several TIMB collections we’ll be rolling out over the weeks leading up to our big 20th...
    Share this: When U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., said that he wouldn’t support President Joe Biden’s signature Build Back Better Act, he set off a wave of breaking news alerts. It was fitting. For months, media coverage has breathlessly focused on the behind-the-scenes wrangling and hour-by-hour negotiations around the legislation. How much has been slashed from the bill today? What does it mean for the future of the Democratic and Republican parties? The roughly $2 trillion program is designed to bolster what is widely seen as a frayed social safety net. But most Americans don’t think it will benefit people like them, a recent NPR/Marist poll shows. And a quarter of Americans can’t even say whether they like or dislike the legislation.
    Humanizing the issue: The testimony of Capitol Police officers made the chaos and violence of Jan. 6 more real and visceral than any video or reporting could. Everyone is a storyteller. Every day, we relate different stories to different audiences with different objectives. How we frame the story, the voice we use, and what details we include all contribute greatly to how audiences respond. Commiserating with a neighbor about our street flooding due to a leaf-blocked storm drain, for example, or calling Comcast about an internet connection that drops randomly, both involve telling our stories in search of a particular outcome. Ideally, we’d not bring the same type of outrage and mutual suffering about the flooded street to the Comcast dilemma; we want good results. Whenever we write, we bring ourselves into the story whether we mean to or not—our word choices reflect our experiences and speech habits. Intentionally including yourself in a story adds depth and perspective that can set your writing apart—no one else has your biography and perspective. Two of the stories rescued this week illustrate the value...
    KHLOE Kardashian has hit out at the "fake s*** that is being said about her personal life in a series of scathing tweets. The 37-year-old shared a series of messages to her Twitter account on Saturday where she hit back at people distorting facts about her personal life.  5Khloe took to Twitter to hit out at "fake s***" that is being said about herCredit: E! Networks 5Khloe shared a series of tweets telling fans she was fed up with the fake stories about her personal lifeCredit: TWITTER In one tweet, the reality star wrote: "HA! some of y'all really just make up anything and swear it's the truth as if you know what's going on. "The truth is never good enough… or juicy enough. So you create a narrative that fits what you choose to believe." The KUWTK star went on to claim that she was being "terrorized" by fake rumors and stories by those who don't know the facts. In a follow-up tweet, she wrote, "It is so old at this point. It's always something about people creating...
    Five takeaways from a groundbreaking Census report Virginia Tech issues statement on reports that LGBTQ flag was stolen, replaced with Confederate flags Spend $500, Pocket $200 Fast with This Top Card Ad Microsoft Amazing Device Lights Up Dark Countertops and Fixes Dark Kitchens Ad Microsoft Refi Rates at 2.03% APR. Do you qualify? Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/15 SLIDES © Everett Collection / Amazon/Courtesy Everett Collection Modern Love Season 2 Is Finally Here - Meet the Cast Behind the Love Stories Amazon Prime's beloved original series Modern Love - inspired by personal essays published in The New York Times column of the same name - is officially back with all new characters and all new stories about love. It's been two years since season one premiered (though it feels much, much longer) and we're excited to dive back into the series that...
    Alaska hiker recounts encounter with bears: Is this the way Im going to die? Military lottery, scooter vandals, red tide: News from around our 50 states Conversations around money were always sensitive when I was growing up. Even sensible topics like how you manage your finances, never mind something as personal as your salary, were off limits. It was understood that you didn't bring up the subject to anyone beyond your immediate family.  © Provided by CNET Social media has us all opening up about finances. Sarah Tew/CNET Things have changed. Social media has shattered old taboos, turning the topic of money on its head. Rather than being a taboo subject, wealth is something to be flaunted on Instagram, shared on Venmo or excruciatingly detailed on the WallStreetBets subreddit. Load Error It's a dynamic that's gotten some people, often celebrities, in trouble. Think Ellen DeGeneres describing enduring quarantine in her mansion as like "being in jail." Those controversies are a strong indication that money is still a touchy subject, particularly given our society's vast wealth gap. But there's no...
    In late February, a stranger attacked Matthew Leung at a bus stop in Rosemead with Leung's own walking stick, severing part of his finger."I feel that we cannot be silent anymore, and this should not be normalized. Recent anti-Asian hate crimes have been excruciating to watch," said Rita Wong of Gates Street Elementary School, who shared Leung's story on his behalf. He's experiencing PTSD following the attack.Leung's story, a longtime Gates Street Elementary School employee, was one of many shared on Friday during a Facebook live hosted by Congresswoman Judy Chu as part of a National Day of Action and Healing. #StopAsianHate was being used to help start that dialogue on social media amid a rise in hate crimes against Asian Americans across the country.Hong Lee described a verbal and racist attack by a man at a Los Angeles restaurant a few months ago.Hate crime legislation proposed by OC assemblywoman would impose harsher penaltiesEMBED More News Videos Legislation introduced by a California assemblywoman from Orange County would impose harsher penalties for defendants convicted of hate crimes. "A man came up...
    CNN’s Brian Stelter spoke of how he almost ended up in a Twitter fight with Donald Trump Jr. after the former president’s son insulted him during a tirade over culture war issues. Stelter opened Reliable Sources on Sunday with a monologue about the “distractions and dribble” that get boosted online and end up taking the public’s attention away from news stories of actual importance. To this end, Stelter pointed to how right-wing media outlets have focused on trivial stories like the disclaimers on old episodes of The Muppets and the rebranding of Mr. Potato Head toys. “There is something wrong when so-called ‘cancel culture’ gets more attention than the troubles that millions of Americans are facing and the importance of a Covid relief bill,” Stelter said. Stelter continued by mocking the “cheap,” “easy” inflation of these types of stories, all while lamenting how they flood the zone by distracting from stories that matter. After that, he offered a personal anecdote about his Twitter feed getting blown-up with personal insults after Trump Jr. compared Stelter to Potato Head during his speech...
    NEW YORK (AP) — /// Edited by Anthony McCartney; available to move anytime Saturday morn. /// Calling a hospital to see if a bed was available for a COVID-19 patient isn’t part of Houston television news anchor Chauncy Glover’s job description. Neither is guiding a viewer online to find a place to be vaccinated. He’s done both, and isn’t alone. Listeners and readers across the country are reaching out directly to journalists for help during the coronavirus pandemic, and many are responding. “We are now doing more than we bargained for,” Glover said. “We have to be smarter on these topics. We have to know more. For so many people, it may be life or death.” It began for Glover last spring, when he came down with COVID-19 and told his story to KTRK-TV viewers. By phone, email and text, he was peppered with questions after getting back to work: What did it feel like? Should I be worried if I have this symptom? What did you do during quarantine to keep from going crazy? One viewer described symptoms that...
    ^ Keep Westword Free Support Us I Support Local Community Journalism Support the independent voice of Denver and help keep the future of Westword free. Support Us Many of the big political stories in the state spilled over into Denver...and vice versa. From the Colorado State Capitol on May 28, lawmakers watched the first demonstration over the murder of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis polis just days before. But dissension in this city didn't just focus on racist law enforcement; residents also debated what to do with homelessness, whether the mayor had too much power...and whether a former mayor should be honored with a neighborhood named after him. Politics became very personal this year. Related Stories The Ten Biggest Colorado Political Stories of 2020 Our Ten Most Popular News Stories of 2020 Denver Monitor Report Critical of Police Actions During Racial-Justice Protests Here are the ten biggest political stories in Denver in 2020: George Floyd Protests Just a few days after the killing of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Author-commentator Jeffrey Toobin has been suspended by the New Yorker and is stepping away from his job as CNN’s senior legal analyst pending what the cable network is calling a “personal matter.” Vice reported earlier Monday that Toobin had exposed himself during a Zoom meeting with staffers of the New Yorker and WNYC radio. In a statement Monday afternoon, the New Yorker said Toobin had been “suspended while we investigate the matter.” It declined further comment. A CNN spokesperson said in a statement that “Jeff Toobin has asked for some time off while he deals with a personal issue, which we have granted.” The 60-year-old Toobin has been a New Yorker writer for more than 20 years and joined CNN in 2002. He is the author of several books, most recently “True Crimes and Misdemeanors: The Investigation of Donald Trump,” published in August. His other works include “The Run of His Life: The People v. O. J. Simpson” and “The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court.”More Entertainment Stories: – Robert Redford's son,...
    Happy Wednesday MarketWatchers. Don’t miss these top stories: Trump says he’ll keep low-income housing out of suburbs as he rescinds Obama-era anti-segregation regulation Housing advocates say the regulation was necessary to combat racial segregation, but Trump says getting rid of it will lead to higher home prices. Republicans want to replace extra $600 unemployment benefit with 70% replacement wages — here’s why that could take months to implement ‘So many people receiving unemployment benefits are self-employed or are gig workers.’ Did the extra $600 unemployment benefit stop people from job hunting? These Yale economists say they finally have an answer Members of the Trump administration have argued that the extra $600 in unemployment benefits Americans are getting creates a disincentive to search for a new job. Republicans and Democrats both want another round of stimulus checks — but here’s where they disagree Republicans unveiled the HEALS Act Monday, while Democrats are backing the HEROES Act passed by the House in May. My father worked in a hospital and died from COVID-19. We can’t afford his burial or funeral expenses —...
    A father raises his children through a prison phone. A 5-year-old girl waits for her 7-year-old brother to return with a handful of stolen food because her refrigerator is empty. A Somali refugee daughter named Asma is sitting in an entire class listening to her high school teacher repeatedly calling her Osama. Those stories are just a handful of the personal narratives that a group of writers from Encanto, City Heights, Barrio Logan, and other neighborhoods in southeast San Diego tell in the new book, Reclaiming Our Stories 2. The 170-page book was recently published by the San Diego City Works Press and edited by Kahlid Paul Alexander, Manuel Paul López, Darius Spearman, and Ebony Tyree. It is a project of Pillars of the Community, a non-profit organization based on Encanto that focuses on issues of social justice and the Muslim community. Reclaiming Our Stories 2 edited by Kahlid Paul Alexander, Manuel Paul Lopez, Darius Spearman and Ebony Tyree. (Courtesy of Pillars of the Community) The book includes 19 personal essays on common Sandieguins, who grew up or...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- COVID-19 Diaries is an ABC7 Originals limited series that shares the personal stories of Bay Area people as we work together to cope with novel coronavirus and re-define what it means to live in the San Francisco Bay Area.Watch episodes below:Bay Area residents share what life is like 2 months into shelter-in-place -- COVID-19 DiariesSmall business owners discuss effects of coronavirus pandemic -- COVID-19 DiariesSan Francisco restaurant Cassava closes to stop COVID-19 infection -- COVID-19 DiariesBay Area doctors and nurses share front-line stories from two coastsBay Area sheltering in place, 1 month later and countingExpecting during the unexpected: Pregnancy during the coronavirus crisisShelter in place with Bay Area-based musician Michael Franti's virtual concertsCoronavirus and the new normal of living in the San Francisco-Bay AreaIf you have a question or comment about the coronavirus pandemic, submit yours via the form below or here.Get the latest news, information and videos about the novel coronavirus pandemic hereRELATED STORIES & VIDEOS:COVID-19 Help: Comprehensive list of resources, informationWhen will the San Francisco Bay Area reopen? Track progress on 6 key metrics...
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