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    BOSTON (CBS) — A new report finds families in the U.S. are spending a quarter of their household income on child care, and the costs are even higher here in Massachusetts. The County Health Rankings & Roadmaps report finds that families in Massachusetts spend between 27% and 46% of their household income on childcare. The report calculates the child care cost burden as the amount families with two children pay as a percentage of household median income. READ MORE: 67 North End Restaurants Apply To Participate In Outdoor DiningThe cost depends on where families are in the state. In suburban areas the burden is about 35%, but in large metro areas it’s 46%. The childcare burden map (Image credit: County Health Rankings & Roadmaps) READ MORE: Powerball Jackpot Grows To $454 Million For Wednesday Night DrawingFamilies in Suffolk County, Bristol County and Cape Cod face some of the highest costs in the state, according to the report. The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services sets the childcare affordability benchmark at 7% – but no counties in America...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Kids in child care may no longer have to quarantine, even if they’re exposed to COVID. The Minnesota Department of Human Services informed child care license holders last week that they no longer need to quarantine children or staff who are exposed to a positive case. Providers will still have to inform families when there’s been an exposure, leaving parents faced with a choice of protecting their child’s health or protecting their jobs. READ MORE: St. Paul Students Plan Walkout Over District's Response To COVID PandemicJillian Flower, from Minnetonka, has two children. She received word that their daycare will follow the updated guidelines from the Minnesota Department of Human Services regarding daycare exposures and quarantines. “I felt conflicted,” Flower said. Previously, child care providers were required to isolate children and staff who had been exposed to someone with COVID-19. As of last week, that is no longer a requirement. The decision will be up to child care providers, who are struggling with a lack of staff while working parents are struggling with juggling work and child care...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Whether it’s because of the cost of daycare, long waitlists or even shutdowns due to COVID-19 cases and exposures, it hasn’t been easy to find child care during the pandemic. However, there is hope through a program in Washington County through the Rutledge Institute, which is located on the campus of California University of Pennsylvania. READ MORE: Port Authority Police Officer Adopts Kitten Found On BusCherie Sears, director of the Rutledge Institute, said the preschool is unique because it not only offers child care and an innovative curriculum for the kids who attend, but it’s also free for families who qualify. “It’s such an incredible opportunity and people don’t know about it,” said Sears. An incredible opportunity, Sears says, that is life-changing for families. “Families do need to qualify financially, but it’s a very generous financial upper limit,” said Sears. Sears said the Rutledge Institute accepts up to 40 kids between the ages of 3 and 5. The program is accepting 20 kids on the preschool side and 20 on the pre-K side. READ...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) -- Several child care centers and preschools have reported positive cases and have had to close. Many of them are being affected by this latest wave, and are encountering unexpected costs.Chatham Nursery School on Redwood Road in Oakland is quiet Monday, after administrators made the tough decision to temporarily close. Two kids tested positive for the omicron variant and other little ones were exposed by siblings who attend schools elsewhere."We felt it was our due diligence to make sure, with so many cases that occurred over a Saturday and Sunday period that we were informed of, that we had to close," said Mike Vasquez of Chatham Nursery School.The decision is especially hard on parents who work full-time.RELATED: COVID hospitalizations skyrocket in kids too young for vaccinesLike most child care centers, Chatham had closed for two months when the pandemic first hit.The nursery school says the health system is so overwhelmed, it's still waiting on guidance from them. The other pressing issue is the cost of testing. Unlike public and private schools, Chatham gets no outside funding.They could...
    Leaders of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops The Republican attack on President Joe Biden’s plan to make child care more affordable and accessible has escalated around a defense of the right to discriminate. Republican politicians and media started by claiming, falsely, that the plan would exclude religious child care providers from receiving the new federal funds. In fact, it very explicitly includes them. But what religious groups are now howling about is that the Democratic plan does say they would have to abide by anti-discrimination rules.  So it’s not that religious child care providers couldn’t take federal subsidies under the Build Back Better proposal. It’s that they couldn’t do that while also discriminating against staff or families and their children for any reason attributed to faith. Biden’s Build Back Better plan would “ensure that middle-class families pay no more than 7 percent of their income on child care and will help states expand access to high-quality, affordable child care to about 20 million children per year—covering 9 out of 10 families across the country with young children,” according to the White House....
    quavondo | E+ | Getty Images For lower-income Hispanic and Latina mothers, affordable and accessible child care would be a lifeline. As the country celebrates National Hispanic Heritage Month, it looks like that may soon become a reality. Democrats have set a deadline of Oct. 31 to enact President Joe Biden's economic agenda, which includes a child-care plan that expands benefits for working families. The specifics are now being negotiated in Congress. The plan called to cap the cost of care at 7% of a family's income if they earn up to 1.5 times the state's median income, but a House committee recently bumped it to two times the state's median income. The lowest-income families wouldn't pay anything. It would also raise wages for child-care workers, 95% of whom are women. The average hourly pay is $10.15 an hour, according to compensation comparison site Payscale. In 2019, 18.9% of those workers were Black women and 17.9% were Latinas, according to an analysis by the National Women's Law Center. Many of those jobs were lost during the pandemic.VIDEO3:0903:09One Year Later: A...
    PHOENIX (CBSDFW/AP) – Eight days into the school year, all five of Amber Cessac’s daughters, ages 4 to 10, had tested positive for COVID-19. Having them all sick at once and worrying about long-term repercussions as other parents at their school, and even her own mother, downplayed the virus, “broke something inside of me,” Cessac said. READ MORE: Fourth Stimulus Check: Will You See Another Relief Payment This Year?“The anxiety and the stress has sort of been bottled up,” she said. “It just felt so, I don’t know, defeating and made me feel so helpless.” Like parents everywhere, Cessac has been dealing with pandemic stress for more than 18 months now. There’s the exhaustion of worrying about the disease itself- made worse by the spread of the more infectious delta variant, particularly among people who refuse vaccinations, which has caused a big increase in infections in children. Just last week, in Richardson, a student and teacher died as a result of complications from COVID-19. The student, Sha’Niyah McGee was a junior at Berkner High School. Friends described her a “kind...
    SACRAMENTO (KPIX) — Thanks to an expansion of transitional kindergarten by Governor Gavin Newsom and state legislators, all four-year-olds California will be able to enroll in publicly-funded school for free, regardless of income. It is a watershed moment for California, which has lagged behind other states in early childhood education. READ MORE: The California Dream: CBS News Poll Reveals Divisions On Climate Change Along Party Lines But while seven in ten Californians polled this spring by Public Policy of California support state-funded preschool, not everyone agrees on how to do it. Joyce Gomez and her husband are thrilled that next year their 3-year-old son Asher may be able to enroll in a free year of school before kindergarten at their neighborhood public elementary school. “I’m so happy! I can’t wait,” Gomez said. The stay-at-home mom says child care is expensive and a free year of pre-K would allow her to go back to work, in addition to giving her son the jump start he needs. “The human brain develops 90 percent between one year old and five years old, so...
    (CNN)Some unaccompanied migrant children, waiting to be reunited with family in the United States, were stuck in parked buses -- at least one for more than three days -- with no access to showers or places to sleep, according to an immigrant advocate.Joel, a 15-year-old boy from Honduras, waited on buses from Saturday to Wednesday, according to Dr. Amy Cohen, a psychiatrist and executive director of Every Last One, a group that advocates for migrant children. CNN is using only his first name because of privacy concerns. For more than three days, Joel was stuck on buses, waiting to be transported to family in Washington state, Cohen -- who's spoken with Joel and his family -- told CNN. "They brought them snacks, he said. They brought him no real food," Cohen said. "They were never permitted to go outside to stretch their legs or anything like that.""It was absolutely horrible. I asked him, what was the feeling in the bus? And he said, everybody was desperate," Cohen added."This is completely unacceptable," Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said in...
    Monkeybusinessimages | Getty Images Low- and middle-income families could get major child-care assistance under President Biden's tax plan. The $1.8 trillion spending and tax credit plan set to be announced by Biden Wednesday night would spend $225 billion over a decade towards high-quality child care for children under the age of 5 and would ensure that families only pay a portion of their total income for child-care services. Under the plan, the average American family with young children may save $14,800 a year on child care. Low-income families would have all of their child-care expenses covered, and those that make 1.5 times their state median income would spend no more than 7% of their annual income on child-care services. Parents will have a range of child-care options to choose from under the plan. More from Invest in You:Young investors are betting on stocks. Here's what to know before jumping inAs home prices rise, here's what buyers can do to land a dealSuze Orman: Here's the best way to get rid of your loans "I like the proposal because it attempts to...
    (CNN)Before the pandemic hit, Juanita Dutton was working hard. A single mother, she has two kids, 8 and 10, one with severe autism and the other with dyslexia. Dutton was employed as a hotel housekeeper while working toward her associate's degree in computer science. She was doing the impossible: surviving on a low income, taking care of her kids and working toward a better future. "I was very busy," she said. The one thing that made her life work, no matter how hard that life was: Her kids were in school full time. Once everything shut down, there was no way for her to maintain her studies or go to work in Lawrence, Kansas. There is no one else to provide medical care or educational support for her kids. Read MoreJuanita Dutton (center), a single mom from Lawrence, Kansas, was forced to leave her job to care for daughters Mia (left), 10, and Kaycee (right), 8, during the pandemic shutdown."I didn't see how I can pay for day care and go to work at the same time," she said. "I...
    Mike Kemp | Blend Images | Getty Images Matt Becker opened his financial advisory practice, Mom and Dad Money, not long after he and his wife, Casey, had their first son, Aiden, and struggled with all the financial decisions new parents need to make. "I looked around and I didn't see a lot of advisors focusing on people in this stage of life," said Becker, a certified financial planner in Gulf Breeze, Florida. Adding another member to your family also adds a myriad of new financial considerations and expenses. A middle-class couple can expect to spend more than $230,000 to raise a child, not including college costs. One estimate found that by 2036, four years at a private university will cost around $303,000, up from $167,000 today. More from FA Playbook:Op-ed: All types of investors can improve their financial fortunesAdvisors guide clients through Covid-19 crisisOp-ed: CARES Act lets you tap your 401(k). What to know first More advisors are helping their clients successfully navigate how to cover their children's expenses without compromising their own financial security. "There is so much...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — The school year starts Tuesday for the Chicago Public Schools with all-remote learning. That means working parents are searching for child care options, and many say the services CPS offers are scarce. Katherine Buitron, for example, is busy turning her home into a classroom for her children: three CPS students between the ages of 10 and 13. Starting Tuesday, she’ll be helping through the school day all while balancing her own full-time job. “My youngest has autism. So that’s our biggest fear right now. The fact that he’s not going to get the support that he needs,” Buitron said. Buitron applied for CPS’ child care services, also known as “supervision sites,” for kids younger than 14. Seats are limited, and she got an email Saturday saying her son doesn’t qualify. “They are expecting the impossible from parents, the teachers and the students,” she said. CPS emailed parents last week saying they’re opening up six schools across the city for supervision sites. At each school, a staff member will supervise classrooms of no more than 15 kids as...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — The school year starts Tuesday for the Chicago Public Schools with all-remote learning. That means working parents are searching for child care options, and many say the services CPS offers are scarce. Katherine Buitron, for example, is busy turning her home into a classroom for her children: three CPS students between the ages of 10 and 13. Starting Tuesday, she’ll be helping through the school day all while balancing her own full-time job. “My youngest has autism. So that’s our biggest fear right now. The fact that he’s not going to get the support that he needs,” Buitron said. Buitron applied for CPS’ child care services, also known as “supervision sites,” for kids younger than 14. Seats are limited, and she got an email Saturday saying her son doesn’t qualify. “They are expecting the impossible from parents, the teachers and the students,” she said. CPS emailed parents last week saying they’re opening up six schools across the city for supervision sites. At each school, a staff member will supervise classrooms...
    GOP scrambles to fend off Kobach in Kansas primary 38,000 Pounds Of Ground Beef Has Been Recalled Over Lack Of Inspection In The U.S. Some foster parents object to new Iowa rules on vaccination, spanking own children DES MOINES — Some Iowa foster parents have objected to new state rules that would require them to have their own children vaccinated and would bar them from spanking their own kids. © Special to the Register Sarah and Sam Jones of Hudson adopted their son, Thomas, after serving as foster parents for him. "It's not the state's duty to parent children that are biological or adopted to the family," said Sam Jones, an Iowa pastor who has served as a foster parent.  The Iowa Department of Human Services is reassessing the rules in light of such complaints, spokesman Matt Highland said. In the lead-up to the 2020 election, all eyes are on Iowa. Get updates of all things Iowa politics delivered to your inbox. “Director (Kelly) Garcia is hearing these concerns and exploring the available options to balance both the safety and...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – Child care centers across New York City are back in business for the first time since being shut down because of the coronavirus pandemic. As CBS2’s Christina Fan reported Monday, parents were still a little apprehensive about sending their children back. Inside Arcadia Children’s Daycare in the Bronx, educational director Sue Sussman has tired making the classroom COVID-19 proof. Colorful circles on the ground teach toddlers about social distancing, and shared toys are locked away in storage. But judging by her empty classroom, the precautions haven’t been enough to ease fears. “People are holding back a little more, because it’s still here. But of course it’s going to go on, we know in reality, really months more,” Sussman told Fan. On a typical day, she usually sees about 20 drop-offs. On Monday, there was just one. CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC Resources, Hotlines, Unemployment & Covering Bills Remote Learning Tools For Parents Teaching At Home Ask Dr. Max Your Health Questions How Make Your Own DIY Face Mask How To Safely Remove Disposable Gloves Tips For Parents To...
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