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    EPA administrator Michael Regan is promising to take action on a toxic railyard in north Houston that local residents say is driving up cancer rates and killing children. For years, those living in the city's Fifth Ward have raised concerns about a former wood treatment facility site owned by Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR), where soil and groundwater were contaminated by creosote during historical operations. State research shows the rate of childhood leukemia is 'significantly greater' than the state average near the site, and one local mom said she believes carcinogenic toxins killed her 13-year-old son Corinthian Giles, who died of leukemia this year. 'He just wanted to make sure that the doctors did everything they could to try to save his life,' a tearful LaTonya Payne told CBS News.  'Until the very last breath, he fought and he fought.' Payne is among a group of frustrated residents demanding action at the site, and on Friday the issue received the attention of EPA boss Regan, who toured the area as part of his 'journey for justice' initiative. LaTonya Payne told CBS News...
    The body of a deceased elderly woman who died in 2018 was dismembered and buried in the backyard of her Las Vegas home by at least two squatters who sold her car and lived off her wealth before being caught by police this spring, authorities said. Lucille Payne, 82, passed away while sitting in a chair and remained there for three years inside her Northwest Valley home before squatters mutilated her mummified body and dug up a shallow grave to bury her, according to police. 'After finding her, the decision was made between several people that they were going to dismember her body and bury her and then basically drain her finances and sell off her belongings, fraudulently,' Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Lt. Ray Spencer said. Payne's death had initially been ruled a homicide by blunt force trauma after investigators received a tip about two people seen digging, and authorities later found her body buried at the Shore Breeze Drive home in April.    Further investigation concluded the cause of Payne's death was 'undetermined,' Metro Police said.  Payne had no...
    A talk with authors Morris Pearl and Erica Payne, capitalist prophets of tax fairness. By Kelly Candaele, for Capital & Main Benjamin Franklin quipped that the only things we can be certain about in life are death and taxes. Being an American, Franklin should have added that we can also be certain that the wealthy will pay a smaller percentage of their income in taxes than regular working people.   In Tax the Rich! How Lies, Loopholes, and Lobbyists Make the Rich Even Richer—Morris Pearl and Erica Payne have written a guidebook on how corporations and the mega-rich protect and expand their wealth with the help of their political enablers. It’s  essential to understanding how complex tax laws—especially the Trump tax “reform” of 2017—perpetuate the obscene wealth gap in the United States.   If you want to know how Facebook avoided paying taxes on $1.1 billion of profits in 2012 and actually qualified for a $429 refund from the federal government, this is the book for you. Morris Pearl, a former managing director of the investment firm BlackRock, is the...
    Fox Business host Charles Payne said the U.S. government needs to “stop promoting the notion that America is too cruel a nation for anyone to succeed.” “Black Wall Street itself had hotels, cafes, newspapers, movie theaters, beauty salons, grocery stores, there were doctor’s offices,” the Fox Business host shared on Tuesday, noting President Joe Biden’s trip to Tulsa, Oklahoma, in the Greenwood District. The district was once known as the Black Wall Street and was wiped out by the Tulsa Race Massacre 100 years ago. “It was a thriving, living example of the American dream,” he added. “And guess what, it came with very little government intervention.” WATCH: Watch the latest video at foxbusiness.com “Now, there were no social transfer payments,” Payne continued. “Just hard work, ingenuity, just that infectious nature of entrepreneurship.” (RELATED: Charles Payne Digs Into Al Sharpton For Making ‘Millions Of Dollars’ While ‘Stoking The Flames Of Anger’) Payne then got personal and talked about how when he was 14 he told everyone he was going to work on Wall Street and only his mom believed this “young black...
    A Montana man pleaded guilty in federal court Monday to lying about the cause of an explosion that killed a Marine veteran, a Justice Department press release said. Stephen Todd Reisinger, 50, pleaded guilty to felony obstruction in an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) investigation, the press release said. A 28-year-old employee named Dustin Payne, was fatally injured when an uncleaned tanker trailer exploded on Oct. 3, 2014. (RELATED: ‘Proxy Fight For The Future Of Fossil Fuels’: Biden Interior Nominee Fields Questions About ‘Radical’ Climate Agenda) Reisinger was in charge of around 40 employees while he was a maintenance manager at the Williston facility of the Nabors Completion and Production Services Company (NCPS), the press release said. Reisinger acknowledged in a plea agreement that he knew tanker trailers transported “’produced water,’ a liquid waste that is generated by oil wells and which contains flammable chemicals.” Payne was welding on a tanker trailer containing produced water, leading to a fatal explosion. Welding on tanks and containers holding flammable products is against federal law. Welders had to receive special training in accordance...
    The 25 best songs about America Awesome vacation rentals that are perfect for pups Meet the coaches that scrutinize the world’s greatest shot It’s late February 2020 and Brandon Payne is sitting in the Accelerate Basketball office lined with framed basketball jerseys and clipped newspaper articles. He’s in Fort Mills, South Carolina, less than a mile from the North Carolina border, but over 2,500 miles from the Golden State Warriors practice facility.  He opens an Instagram story that bridges the gap between him and his client, Stephen Curry, who is shooting the rust off of the shot that turned the Warriors into the Beatles, searching for the finishing touch to his rehab after breaking his wrist early in the season. For fans, the video builds excitement for the return of the baby-faced assassin. But Payne finds reason for alarm. He texts Curry. “Please stop shooting until I get there in a few days. We can’t let this keep going. I gotta show you something.” “He had some dead spots from the surgery,” Payne explains. “He couldn’t necessarily feel his...
    An international team of astronomers has discovered the cosmic equivalent of a regularly gushing geyser: a distant galaxy that erupts roughly every 114 days. Using data from different space missions, scientists have studied 20 repeated bursts of an event called ASASSN-14ko. These various telescopes and instruments are sensitive to different wavelengths of light. Using them collaboratively, the scientists obtained more detailed images of the outbursts. We believe that a supermassive black hole in the center of the galaxy creates the explosions as it partially consumes an orbiting giant star, « said Anna Payne, a NASA graduate fellow at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, who presented the findings at the 237th virtual meeting of the American Astronomical Society. An article on the source and these observations, led by Payne, is undergoing scientific review. Astronomers classify galaxies with unusually bright and variable centers as active galaxies. These objects can produce much more energy than the combined contribution of all their stars, including higher-than-expected levels of visible, ultraviolet, and X-ray light. Astrophysicists believe that the additional emission comes from near the galaxy’s...
    The Trump administration submitted new documents Tuesday in support of an Indiana Catholic school that was sued for firing a teacher in a same-sex marriage. In a 35-page amicus brief, the Department of Justice argued that the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Indianapolis is, like other religious employers in the U.S., “entitled to employ in key roles only persons whose beliefs and conduct are consistent” with its “religious precepts.” Additionally, the brief states the “Constitution bars the government from interfering with the autonomy of religious organizations.” The brief went on to argue that Joshua Payne-Elliot, the teacher who filed the lawsuit against the Archdiocese of Indianapolis in July 2019, has “the responsibility of educating and forming students in the faith” and continuing to employ him would “interfere with the Archdiocese’s public expression of Church doctrine regarding marriage.” The DOJ’s brief comes a year after it filed a “statement of interest” in the same case, with the department arguing in a news release at the time that “the First Amendment protects the right of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Indianapolis to interpret...
    Fox Business anchor Charles Payne told “America’s Newsroom” on Wednesday that Twitter's moves to add warning labels to President Trump’s tweets feels like it's “personal.” “It does feel like more and more of these actions by Twitter are more personal because when you juxtapose them against other tweets that have been put out by world leaders, [or] by just regular commentators it really feels like now there is this sort of selective battle against the White House and President Trump and it’s not going unnoticed," Payne said. He added that “people are getting concerned about this particularly now as there is talk about removing some of the safeguards that social media has enjoyed and not having to have the responsibility of being publishers.” Last month Trump signed an executive order that interprets Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996 (CDA) as not providing statutory liability protections for tech companies that engage in censorship and political conduct. VideoThe president's order, which also cuts federal funding for social media platforms that censor users' political views, came just two days after Twitter took the unprecedented step of slapping a "misleading" warning label on two...
    Iskra Lawrence and her boyfriend Philip Payne have given a detailed description of her at-home water birth as they both recalled how their first child needed to be resuscitated by their midwife.   For her latest YouTube video, the 29-year-old model sat down with her partner and newborn to share their different reactions to the moments leading up to their child's traumatic birth two months ago.  'I think I have such a newfound respect for you, and just for women in general,' Philip, 32, told Iskra. 'The pain that you were going through and then to do it unmedicated, I can't.' Scroll down for video   Memories: Iskra Lawrence and her boyfriend Philip Payne have opened up about the traumatic birth of their first child two months ago  Looking back: Iskra, 29, had an at-home water birth in April. The couple has yet to reveal the baby's name or gender  He described the birth as being 'superhuman' and 'very primal.'  Iskra, who has yet to reveal her baby's name or gender, admitted that she didn't realize the contractions would be so...
    LONDON (AP) — In the end, Margaret Payne scaled her mountain, one step at a time. The 90-year-old grandmother who launched an epic climb to raise money for charity completed her fundraiser Tuesday. Paybe scaled the stairs at her home the equivalent of 731 meters (2,398 feet) — enough to reach the peak of Scotland’s iconic Suilven mountain. Payne, who is from Ardvar in the Scottish Highlands, calculated that climbing 282 flights of her staircase would get her to the top of a mountain she climbed only once, when she was 15. “I just climbed a few stairs every day until I got to the top, 282 times,’’ Payne told The Associated Press. The feat took her 73 days and kept her busy for 10 weeks while the U.K. sheltered in lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Payne took on the challenge after being inspired by military veteran Tom Moore, who completed 100 laps of his garden just before his 100th birthday to raise money for the National Health Service. The feat captivated the lockdown nation, and Moore ended up...
    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) - China and Russia were using the heightened anxiety around the coronavirus pandemic to undermine Western democracies by spreading disinformation online, Australia’s foreign minister said. The disinformation contributed to a “climate of fear and division” when the world needed cooperation and understanding, Foreign Minister Marise Payne said in a speech at the Australian National University, a text of which was released by her office late Tuesday. “Concerningly, we have seen disinformation pushed and promoted around the coronavirus pandemic and around some of the social pressures that have been exacerbated by the pandemic,” Payne said. TOP STORIES Four St. Louis police officers charged with beating undercover colleague FBI picked most outlandish anti-Trump dossier claims for official U.S.-Russia report Chick-fil-A apologizes for confusion after people mistake photo for supporting police “It is troubling that some countries are using the pandemic to undermine liberal democracy to promote their own more authoritarian models,” she added. Payne referred to a European Union commission report last week that said “foreign actors and certain third countries, in particular Russia and China” are...
    Any criticism of Nickelodeon's popular children's' show "Paw Patrol" as pro-police propaganda is unfounded, Fox Business host Charles Payne asserted Thursday. Appearing on "Outnumbered" with host Melissa Francis, Payne remarked that his five grandkids love "Paw Patrol." "Particularly my oldest grandson loves it, loves it, loves it," he noted. REPORTED OUTRAGE TOWARD NICKELODEON CARTOON 'PAW PATROL' SPARKS WILD REACTIONS ONLINE The show, however, drew criticism and outrage last week over a Twitter post by #BlackOutTuesday –­ a social media movement which intended to amplify black voices –­ when commenters angrily attacked Chase, "Paw Patrol's" good boy German shepherd police officer. “Euthanize the police dog,” they urged. “Defund the paw patrol.” “All dogs go to Heaven, except the class traitors in the Paw Patrol," one user wrote. A New York Times pop culture critic wrote that while comments were intended as jokes, they also were not. "As the protests against racist police violence enter their third week, the charges are mounting against fictional cops, too. Even big-hearted cartoon police dogs –­ or maybe especially big-hearted cartoon police dogs –­ are on notice," wrote Amanda Hess. "The effort to publicize police brutality also means...
    A fired up Charles Payne ripped big tech companies on "Bill Hemmer Reports" Wednesday, accusing them of not coming through for African-American workers while professing to support the Black Lives Matter movement. "There was a lot of a lot of talk ... similar talk back in 2014 and 2015, all of Silicon Valley pledged to do better," Payne began. "They said, 'We're going to do much better.' What do they do? They wrote a lot of checks, right? Apple wrote a check for $50 million. Google wrote a check for $150 million. Microsoft wrote a big check. They all wrote checks." "But from 2014 to 2019, the change in black employment at Facebook grew 0.8 percent. At Apple, only two percent. Microsoft, 1.1 percent. Twitter, 3.7 percent. Google, 2.8 percent ... Amazon had the largest growth, 26.5 percent ... of their workers are black workers. But here's the rub: only eight percent are in management. So they wrote a lot of checks. They did no hiring. AS GEORGE FLOYD PROTESTS CONTINUE, AMAZON, GOOGLE PLEDGE MILLIONS TO RACIAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS "And now they're making the same exact pledges,"...
    Fox Business host Charles Payne told "Bill Hemmer Reports" Monday that he found Amazon's public support of the Black Lives Matter movement to be disingenuous, and said the online retail giant should do more for black employees. Over the weekend, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos said he would be "happy to lose" customers like a man who sent a profanity-laced email attacking the company's "Black Lives Matter" message. Amazon and other corporations have advanced that message as protests continue in response to George Floyd's death. "A lot of companies are writing checks, making statements and it's the cool, hip thing to do," Payne said. "And to a degree, I'm not surprised ... I looked at Amazon and they -- while they have a fair amount of black folks working for them, very few of them make it up to the ranks of manager. "If Jeff Bezos wants to really put his money where his mouth is, he probably should be providing more internal opportunities for his workers." Amazon claims that 26.5 percent of its employees and 8.3 percent of its managers are African-American. AS GEORGE FLOYD PROTESTS CONTINUE, AMAZON, GOOGLE PLEDGE MILLIONS TO RACIAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS Payne added that a lot of...
    Fox Business host Charles Payne questioned on Friday how some governors can "chastise" people for wanting to reopen businesses during the coronavirus pandemic while at the same time praising protesters who are assembling en masse. “The same people that really wagged their fingers. I saw a 70-year-old barber threatened [with] prison in Michigan because he wanted to live, he wanted to work,” the host of “Making Money” told “Fox & Friends.” “It’s a crazy time and this is another crazy aspect of it,” Payne said amid the current wave of protests in New York City over George Floyd's death while in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25. KAROL MARKOWICZ: REMEMBER COVID-19? BUSINESSES STILL CAN'T OPEN WHILE MASSIVE CROWDS GATHER Payne reacted to a New York Post op-ed that urged for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio to allow businesses to reopen. Markowicz blasted the government’s double standard for protesters and business owners amid the coronavirus pandemic. "Few business owners I spoke to would let me use their name or the name of their business. Several told me they’re afraid of retaliation by a government that has...
    Fox Business anchor Charles Payne said on Tuesday that it is “heartbreaking” to witness the destruction of businesses that occurred during the protests over George Floyd's death on May 25 while in police custody. “Target may be able to endure it, obviously, a lot more than say the small business owner down the street who worked for 40 years, saved up all of their money and thought they were fulfilling a lifelong dream,” the host of "Making Money with Charles Payne" told “America’s Newsroom.” The civil unrest erupting across America following the death of Floyd is likely to slow the U.S. economy’s comeback from the COVID-19 pandemic. Violent protests and looting have left a trail of destruction from New York to Chicago to Los Angeles, stressing already frazzled business owners who now have to clean off graffiti, sweep up shattered glass and replace pilfered merchandise and furnishings. TRUMP SIGNS SOCIAL MEDIA EXECUTIVE ORDER THAT CALLS FOR REMOVAL OF LIABILITY PROTECTIONS OVER 'CENSORING' “This is a net negative, both in the short term and in the long term,” Sri Kumar, president of the Santa Monica, California-based...
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