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Justices John Roberts:

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    (CNN)There was a little seen warm moment between Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Clarence Thomas last November 1, just before the Supreme Court heard arguments on Texas' abortion ban. Roberts announced that 30 years ago on that exact date, a ceremonial investiture for Thomas had been held. Thomas, sitting to Roberts' right, beamed and slung his arm over the chief's shoulder. That collegiality in the courtroom, filled with only a few dozen spectators because of Covid-19 protocols, has vanished. The two justices are now engaged in an epic struggle over a new abortion case that could mean the end of Roe v. Wade nationwide and unsettle the public image of the court. Thomas says Supreme Court after leaked draft opinion is not the court of Ginsburgs eraLast week at a Dallas conference, Thomas took a surprising, public jab at Roberts. Thomas has long touted the good relations inside the court and avoided public criticism of colleagues. He might not always have embraced his colleagues, but he avoided letting any enmity slip. Thomas last week recalled the court atmosphere...
    Are conservatives about to be stabbed in the back by Chief Justice John Roberts again? The danger certainly seems plausible. A recent editorial in The Wall Street Journal reminds us that the court is about to rule on a Mississippi abortion case called Dobbs v. Jackson. It has the potential to overturn Roe v. Wade, with the oral argument suggesting that five justices are leaning in that direction. The only catch? As The Journal notes, “a ferocious lobbying campaign is trying to change their minds” and during oral arguments, Justice Roberts seemed to be trying to “find a middle way.” More concerning, The Journal speculates that Roberts “may be trying to turn another Justice now.” Back in 2012, Chief Justice Roberts was persuaded to switch his position on The Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. To rationalize his decision to uphold the law, Roberts employed a bit of judicial gymnastics. A decade later, the prospect of the Court upholding Mississippi’s 15-week abortion ban—while stopping short of overturning Roe (ostensibly, the “middle way” Roberts would negotiate)—would require a similar degree of inventiveness....
    (CNN)During his final week ever of Supreme Court oral arguments as a justice, Stephen Breyer often hung his head, toward the lawyers in the well of the courtroom, and held his balding pate in his hands.The last disputes of the 2021-22 argument session were especially difficult, involving religious expression, immigration policy and Native American tribal authority. Most of the nine justices showed their frustration through the long hours of questioning.In the air were also expectations of how this court, with the new conservative supermajority, will soon rule on the tough cases this week and controversies over abortion rights, gun control and public funding of religious education argued earlier this session. The Supreme Courts evolution on the separation of church and stateYet Breyer, as he has done for his 28 years on the high court, still slipped into his characteristic whimsy, zany hypotheticals and tangled multi-part questions."Respectfully," Texas Solicitor General Judd Stone said at one point during Tuesday's immigration case, "I may need help keeping all four questions straight in my head."Read MoreRELATED: Supreme Court examines Biden's power to set US...
    (CNN)Chief Justice John Roberts has long trumpeted the Supreme Court's institutional integrity, saying the nine justices differ from elected politicians and calling out anyone who threatens to undermine that message. He has rebuked former President Donald Trump and members of Congress. But now the threat comes from within, and Roberts faces a dilemma. The chief justice is not the boss of Justice Clarence Thomas or any of the associate justices. Each decides when to recuse himself or herself from a case and no internal process exists to sanction a justice's failure to sit out a case. When recusal occurs, rarely is a reason made public. What to know about the Justice Clarence Thomas recusal debate around his wifes textsFurther, Thomas' stature has been enhanced in recent years by the new conservative appointees. He enjoys a personal loyalty among the right wing that has eluded Roberts. Thomas is now fueling an ethics controversy affecting the reputation of the entire court. He did not recuse himself from cases involving the 2020 election and January 6, 2021, rampage at the Capitol, although...
    Although President Joe Biden’s search for a U.S. Supreme Court justice to replace the retiring Justice Stephen Breyer is historic — Biden has promised to give the High Court its first Black female justice — it won’t be a game changer as far as shifting the Court’s liberal/conservative balance. But law professor Ira C. Lupu, who teaches at George Washington University, has an idea that would create such a shift: if Chief Justice John Roberts were to retire and give Biden a chance to nominate a replacement. Of course, that’s unlikely to happen. Roberts, who turned 67 on January 27, is a conservative George W. Bush appointee — and one of the reasons President Bush nominated Roberts is the fact that he's conservative. But Roberts hasn’t been as far to the right as Justice Clarence Thomas or the late Justice Antonin Scalia; he has turned out to be relatively nuanced at times. And Lupu argues that Roberts, like Breyer, should step down and let Biden nominate a replacement while he has a chance. “When Amy Coney Barrett replaced...
    Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts should resign in 2022 so President Joe Biden can name a successor before the next Congress is sworn in following the midterm elections, argued Politico's founding editor. John Harris, who co-founded the website 15 years ago, noted that Roberts argued during confirmation that judges are like baseball umpires and don't make the rules, instead only calling balls and strikes. "The analogy is vivid and folksy — and even more starkly at odds with reality today than when Roberts invoked it back in 2005," Harris wrote. "There is one sure way, however, that Roberts could prove he deserves the benefit of the doubt: He could join Justice Stephen Breyer in announcing his retirement at the end of the court’s term this summer." Harris explained that retirement should be viewed as a test of whether Roberts really believes what he has argued. "This surprising act would be most likely to advance what the Chief Justice says he wants — a revival of public faith in the Court’s institutional legitimacy, and that its rulings flow from something...
    But in the face of these statements, NPR has continued to indicate that it stands by its original reporting. "On Wednesday, Sotomayor and Gorsuch issued a statement saying that she did not ask him to wear a mask," Totenberg wrote in a piece on Wednesday. "NPR's report did not say that she did. Then, the chief justice issued a statement saying he 'did not request Justice Gorsuch or any other justice to wear a mask on the bench.' The NPR report said the chief justice's ask to the justices had come 'in some form.'" Totenberg declared that, "NPR stands by its reporting." She then continued, "What is incontrovertible is that all the justices have at once started wearing masks — except Gorsuch. Meanwhile, Sotomayor has stayed out of the courtroom. Instead, she has participated remotely in the court's arguments and the justices' weekly conference, where they discuss the cases and vote on them." Critics pounced on a tweet in which Totenberg noted that NPR is standing behind her reporting. "Your reporting is trash. Every party named in it...
    Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts says the federal judiciary needs to do more to ensure judges don't participate in cases where they have financial conflicts of interest. Roberts made the comments as part of his annual report on the federal judiciary released Friday evening. Roberts pointed to a series of stories recently in The Wall Street Journal that found that 'between 2010 and 2018, 131 federal judges participated in a total of 685 matters involving companies in which they or their families owned shares of stock.' Federal judges and Supreme Court justices are required under a federal ethics law to recuse themselves from cases where they have a personal financial interest. U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts said in a year-end report published on Friday that U.S. federal judges need 'more rigorous' ethics training to ensure they are not hearing disputes in which they have a financial interest 'Let me be crystal clear: the Judiciary takes this matter seriously. We expect judges to adhere to the highest standards, and those judges violated an ethics rule,' Roberts wrote in the nine-page report....
    Chief Justice John Roberts cited two cases from early constitutional law with a dire warning as the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday delivered a ruling on the near-total ban on abortion passed by Republicans in Texas. In an opinion where he concurred in part and dissented in part, Roberts was joined by Justices Sonia Sotamayor and Elena Kagan. "The clear purpose and actual effect of S. B. 8 has been to nullify this Court’s rulings," Roberts wrote, listing the legislative name of the Texas bill. "It is, however, a basic principle that the Constitution is the 'fundamental and paramount law of the nation,' and '[i]t is emphatically the province and duty of the judicial department to say what the law is,'" Roberts said, citing the landmark 1803 Supreme Court case Marbury v. Madison that established the principle of judicial review. "Indeed, '[i]f the legislatures of the several states may, at will, annul the judgments of the courts of the United States, and destroy the rights acquired under those judgments, the constitution itself becomes a solemn mockery,'" he continued, citing United...
    (CNN)This is a crucial time for the reconstituted Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts, a bench still finding its bearings, seeing public approval drop and facing new scrutiny over its operations and lack of transparency. The Department of Justice on Monday asked the court to halt a near-total ban on abortion in Texas. The justices' prior action in a related case permitted the prohibition to take effect seven weeks ago in the country's second more populous state.The future of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that made abortion legal nationwide, hangs in the balance. And the institutional stakes are equally significant. The conflict at this stage of the Texas litigation hinges on the role of the federal judiciary -- including the high court nine -- to vindicate constitutional rights. Justice Department asks Supreme Court to block Texas 6-week abortion ban"For half a century, this Court has held that a state may not prohibit any woman from making the ultimate decision to terminate her pregnancy before viability (when the fetus can live outside the womb)," Department of Justice lawyers...
    The Supreme Court's ruling in the matter of the Texas law banning abortion when there is a fetal heartbeat is the latest high-profile decision in which Chief Justice John Roberts sided with liberal justices against his conservative colleagues. While Roberts, who was appointed by former President George W. Bush, was not on the winning side this time he differed with the Republican-appointed Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett, who said the abortion providers seeking relief had not shown that the people they wish to enjoin can or would enforce the law. Roberts said that given the complex issues involved and the short time the court had to make a determination, he would grant the injunction to maintain the status quo. SUPREME COURT VOTES 5-4 TO LEAVE TEXAS ABORTION LAW IN PLACE "I would accordingly preclude enforcement of S. B. 8 by the respondents to afford the District Court and the Court of Appeals the opportunity to consider the propriety of judicial action and preliminary relief pending consideration of the plaintiffs’ claims," Roberts said...
    THE chief justice of the United States is the highest-ranking officer of the US federal judiciary and of the Supreme Court. Nine justices make up the current Supreme Court of the US, one chief justice and eight associate justices. 4Honorable John G. Roberts Jr is the current Chief Justice of the United StatesCredit: Getty Who is the current Chief Justice of the United States? The Honorable John G Roberts Jr, is the 17 Chief Justice of the United States. The chief justice has significant influence in the selection of cases for review, presides when oral arguments are held and leads the discussion of cases among the justices. Roberts has held the chief justice post since 2005, and authored the majority opinion in several landmark cases, including Shelby County v. Holder, King v. Burwell, National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius and Department of Homeland Security v. Regents of the University of California. Roberts presided over the first impeachment trial of Donald Trump in early 2020, however, he declined to preside over the second impeachment trial of Trump. 4John Roberts has held the chief justice post since...
    (CNN)Chief Justice John Roberts has received his two doses of the coronavirus vaccine, the Supreme Court said Monday."The Chief Justice has taken steps to protect against infection, including minimizing contact with staff, regular testing, and receiving both doses of the Pfizer vaccine," public information officer Kathy Arberg wrote in an email, responding to questions from CNN about precautions to prevent exposure to the virus.She declined to say when Roberts, who turns 66 on January 27, received the second dose.John Roberts cant escape the shadow of Donald TrumpThe nine justices are hearing oral arguments via teleconference and most are working from home. But Roberts goes into the building regularly. Other justices occasionally work at the court.About 100 of the 350 non-security court staffers have been working in the building.Read MoreMembers of Congress, along with the justices, began getting their first doses of the vaccine in mid-December through the Capitol physician's office. Court officials have generally declined to reveal the status of the justices' vaccinations or other Covid precautions for staff.Arberg told CNN on Monday that, "all employees adhere to recommended (US...
    Chief Justice John G. Roberts administers the Judicial Oath to U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett as her husband Jesse Barrett holds the Bible on October 27, 2020 in Washington, DC. Fred Schilling/Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States via Getty Images With Justice Amy Coney Barrett anchoring a new, arch-conservative majority of justices, Chief Justice John Roberts is no longer the one in power. In the first major public act of Donald Trump's Supreme Court, the majority ruled against New York attendance restrictions to religious services to limit the spread of COVID-19. Barrett's arrival in the seat held by Ruth Bader Ginsburg means the chief's vote is no longer necessary if conservatives are seeking expansive rulings in the cultural and social issues that matter to them.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. When the Supreme Court of the United States decides something in the middle of the night, there is often a true emergency: a prisoner on death row may be seeking mercy before his execution, or a law or executive order...
    (CNN)As another high-stakes confrontation between Democrats and Republicans went down to the wire, Chief Justice John Roberts again crept left and sided with the liberals.Roberts' vote on Monday night, in a ballot dispute in the battleground state of Pennsylvania critical to President Donald Trump's reelection bid, led to a 4-4 Supreme Court deadlock. That left in place a Pennsylvania court decision allowing mailed ballots to be counted up to three days after Election Day, despite familiar yet unfounded claims from Republicans regarding "the taint of" illegal ballots.It was not the first time Roberts, a 2005 appointee of Republican George W. Bush, has moved left in a highly charged partisan case to cinch the outcome, but it may be one of the last.The Supreme Court is on the cusp of a transformation, less one week before it likely sees the addition of a conservative jurist, Amy Coney Barrett, and two weeks before a presidential election. Barrett, 48, has a record and approach to the law that puts her to the far right of the 65-year-old Roberts.Supreme Court allows Pennsylvania to count...
    Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts quickly sided with the liberal side of the high court against President Trump's cancellation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The Supreme Court ruled last month in a 5-4 decision that the way Trump repealed the DACA program was illegal, claiming it violated the Administrative Procedure Act. Roberts, the swing vote in the case, enthused almost all of the liberal minority by immediately joining its opinion, contrary to his usual method of waiting until the end of the process before casting his vote in significant cases. Roberts faced criticism from a deluge of right-wing voices for his decision, solidifying a perception among conservatives that the chief justice has become a reliable fifth vote for the liberal side to enact its desired jurisprudence. According to a report from CNN, Roberts revealed his intention to vote with liberals shortly after oral arguments on the matter, believing the Trump administration failed to articulate a legal justification for its rescission of the DACA program. Roberts relied primarily on his interpretation of the Administrative Procedure...
    (CNN)Chief Justice John Roberts did not flinch.When Roberts joined liberals on the Supreme Court to preserve an Obama-era program shielding young undocumented immigrants who came to the US as children, he surprised some of his colleagues by voting against the Trump administration from the beginning, according to multiple sources familiar with the inner workings of the court. About this seriesJoan Biskupic takes you inside the Supreme Court with exclusive new details about how the court handled its pivotal term that dealt with LGBTQ rights, abortion and investigating President Donald Trump.New details obtained by CNN reveal how Roberts maneuvered on controversial cases in the justices' private sessions, at times defying expectations as he sided with liberal justices. Roberts exerted unprecedented control over cases and the court's internal operations, especially after the nine were forced to work in isolation because of Covid-19.The chief justice, for the first time in his tenure on the court, voted to strike down a state law that would diminish access to abortion and, in a decision for the ages, rejected President Donald Trump's extensive claims of "temporary...
    WASHINGTON - After 15 years on the bench, Chief Justice John Roberts has emerged as what many legal experts describe as the most influential head of the Supreme Court since the 1940s. With two of its nine members appointed by President Donald Trump, the conservative-dominated court was thought by many to be drifting far to the right and threatening to undo progressive social policies. Instead, during its 2019-2020 term, which concluded last week, the court under Roberts defied Trump and his conservative allies in a string of cases, casting a light on the otherwise conservative chief justice’s inclination and ability to achieve consensus. These opinions struck down a Louisiana abortion law, expanded protections for LGBTQ people, and kept intact a government program for young undocumented immigrants. In two other cases on the final day of the court’s term, the justices rejected Trump’s claims of immunity from subpoena for his financial records. FILE - Justice Neil Gorsuch speaks during an interview in his chambers at the Supreme Court in Washington, September 4, 2019.At the center of it all was...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Chief Justice John Roberts spent a night in a hospital last month after he fell and injured his forehead, a Supreme Court spokeswoman said Tuesday night. Roberts was walking for exercise near his home June 21 when he fell, court spokeswoman Kathleen L. Arberg said in an emailed statement. The injury required sutures, she said, and out of an abundance of caution, Roberts stayed in the hospital overnight. Roberts’ injury and hospitalization was first reported by The Washington Post, which reported that the fall happened at the Chevy Chase Club in Maryland. Roberts, 65, suffered a seizure at his summer home in Maine in 2007, causing a fall that resulted in minor scrapes, and had a similar episode in 1993. Arberg said that Roberts’ doctors “ruled out a seizure” this time. “They believe the fall was likely due to light-headedness caused by dehydration,” she said. The fall took place three days after the court grabbed headlines with a 5-4 decision written by Roberts rejecting President Donald Trump’s effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants. Supreme Court...
    WASHINGTON -- Chief Justice John Roberts spent a night in a hospital last month after he fell and injured his forehead, a Supreme Court spokeswoman said Tuesday night.Roberts was walking for exercise near his home June 21 when he fell, court spokeswoman Kathleen L. Arberg said in an emailed statement. The injury required sutures, she said, and out of an abundance of caution, Roberts stayed in the hospital overnight.Roberts' injury and hospitalization was first reported by The Washington Post, which reported that the fall happened at the Chevy Chase Club in Maryland.Roberts, 65, suffered a seizure at his summer home in Maine in 2007, causing a fall that resulted in minor scrapes, and had a similar episode in 1993. Arberg said that Roberts' doctors "ruled out a seizure" this time."They believe the fall was likely due to light-headedness caused by dehydration," she said.The fall took place three days after the court grabbed headlines with a 5-4 decision written by Roberts rejecting President Donald Trump's effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants.EMBED More News Videos ABC News special report:...
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