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TWO more Brits have been diagnosed with Monkeypox, a UK health agency has warned.

The newly-infected pair live together in the same household and are not linked to the previous confirmed case in England which was announced on May 7, the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) said.

3Monkeypox has been confirmed in the UK

Of the latest two cases, one person is receiving care at the expert infectious disease unit at St Mary’s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust in London.

People who might have been in close contact with either case are being contacted and given information and health advice, the UKHSA said.

The rare disease is spread by wild animals in parts of west or central Africa.

Dr Colin Brown, director of clinical and emerging infections at the UKHSA, said: “While investigations remain ongoing to determine the source of infection, it is important to emphasise it does not spread easily between people and requires close personal contact with an infected symptomatic person."

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It comes as the first case of Monkeypox was confirmed in the UK after a patient travelled from Nigeria, the UKHSA said on May 7.

The patient travelled from Nigeria and is now being treated at St Thomas's Hospital in London.

UKHSA is now working with the NHS to contact anyone who might have been in close contact to the infected person.

This includes passengers who travelled "in close proximity" on their flight to the UK.

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It is the sixth-ever case of the rare disease in the UK after two patients were identified in North Wales in 2021.

In 2018, more than 50 people were warned they may have been exposed to the disease.

An NHS nurse caught the virus while changing the bedsheets of a patient in hospital, blaming "pathetically small" protective gloves.

The disease is extremely rare and is not easily spread between people.

However, it can be transmitted through contact with clothing or linens - including bedding - used by an infected patient.

Direct contact with with monkeypox scabs or a person with a rash coughing or sneezing can spread the virus.

Symptoms include fever, a headache, chills, exhaustion, aches and swollen lymph nodes.

A rash usually spreads from the face across the body around five days after a fever appears before forming a scab.

What is monkeypox?

Monkeypox is an infectious disease caused by the monkeypox virus.

This particular virus is a rare zoonosis, this means that it is transmitted to humans from animal.

It primarily occurs in remote parts of central and west Africa, near tropical rain forests.

In Africa, human infections have been documented through the handling of infected monkeys, Gambian giant rats and squirrels.

Eating the inadequately cooked meat of an infected animal is a risk.

Human-to-human transmission can result from close contact with the skin lesions of an infected person, or objects recently contaminated by the patient.

This generally requires prolonged face-to-face contact, putting loved ones at greater risk.

Transmission can also occur via the placenta, known as congenital monkeypox.

Initial symptoms include:

  • fever
  • headache
  • muscle aches
  • backache
  • swollen lymph nodes
  • chills
  • exhaustion

A painful rash and open sores can then develop, usually starting on the face.

If the rash spreads to the eyes it can cause blindness.

Symptoms generally last from 14 to 21 days, with severe cases relating to age, extent of virus exposure, the patient's health and the severity of complications.

The symptoms are usually mild and most people recover within a few weeks after receiving treatment in a specialist hospital.

It has a mortality rate of between one and 10 per cent, with most deaths occurring in younger age groups.

Dr Colin Brown, Director of Clinical and Emerging Infections, UKHSA, said: "It is important to emphasise that monkeypox does not spread easily between people and the overall risk to the general public is very low.

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"We are working with NHS England and NHS Improvement (NHSEI) to contact the individuals who have had close contact with the case prior to confirmation of their infection, to assess them as necessary and provide advice.

"UKHSA and the NHS have well established and robust infection control procedures for dealing with cases of imported infectious disease and these will be strictly followed."

3The zoonotic virus causes rashes and blistersCredit: Getty 3Severe cases are more common among children

News Source: the-sun.com

Tags: health nhs hospital close contact swollen lymph nodes infectious disease the rare disease the rare disease infected person in the uk after an infected with monkeypox working the patient the disease the patient the disease

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DC hospitals comprehensive program extends beyond medical care to help young cancer patients

A Reston, Virginia, woman diagnosed with a rare cancer when she was a 20-year-old college student at Virginia Tech believes in a new program with a holistic approach to helping patients live a good life during and after cancer care. Courtesy Eileen Fauteux Eileen Fauteux, 26, was diagnosed with a rare pediatric cancer, Ewing sarcoma, that required emergency surgery to remove a tumor that had wrapped around her spinal cord. Courtesy Eileen Fauteux Two weeks after graduating college, Fauteux went to physician assistant school, and she’s now working as a physician assistant in Reston, focusing on spine surgery. Courtesy Eileen Fauteux After more than a year of intensive rounds of chemotherapy and proton beam radiation, Fauteux returned to her life before her diagnosis. Courtesy Eileen Fauteux A Reston, Virginia, woman diagnosed with a rare cancer when she was a 20-year-old college student at Virginia Tech believes in the program. Courtesy Eileen Fauteux Dr. Jeffrey A. Toretsky, chief of MedStar Georgetown University Hospital’s Division of Pediatric, Adolescent, and Young Adult Hematology/Oncology, is a leading expert in pediatric and young adult survivorship programs. Courtesy MedStar Georgetown University Hospital (1/6) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print.

A cancer diagnosis can be daunting at any age, but a D.C. hospital has created a comprehensive program to help guide adolescents and young adults through their diagnosis, treatment and post-treatment care.

The MedStar Georgetown University Hospital Pediatric and Young Adult Survivorship Program takes a holistic approach to helping patients live a good life during and after cancer care.

It takes into account a patient’s physical health, academic and social development and coping skills; it offers access to psychologists, social workers, integrative medicine specialists, nutritionists and physical and occupational therapists. It even helps with financial and insurance concerns.

A Reston, Virginia, woman diagnosed with a rare cancer when she was a 20-year-old college student at Virginia Tech believes in the program.

Eileen Fauteux, 26, was diagnosed with a rare pediatric cancer, Ewing sarcoma, that required emergency surgery to remove a tumor that had wrapped around her spinal cord. After more than a year of intensive rounds of chemotherapy and proton beam radiation, Fauteux returned to her life before her diagnosis.

“I finished up and went back to school and basically tried to act like nothing ever happened and grew my hair out and relearned how to walk,” she said.

The survivorship program has helped Fauteux keep track of appointments for follow-up MRIs and chest CT scans and with the cardiologist. It has also educated her about potential long-term side effects from the chemotherapy drugs. Lastly, the program offers massage therapy and acupuncture free of charge.

“This survivorship program basically makes my life very easy, and for anybody who’s gone through any cancer treatment or follow-up care, you know if there’s any stress that can be relieved in any way, I’ll definitely take it,” she said. “They also have, not to mention, this amazing massage therapist in their office whenever I go there.”

The program was created about 3 1/2 years ago by Dr. Jeffrey A. Toretsky, chief of MedStar Georgetown University Hospital’s Division of Pediatric, Adolescent, and Young Adult Hematology/Oncology, who is a leading expert in pediatric and young adult survivorship programs.

Toretsky is a researcher working to develop a drug to try to bring hope to patients with Ewing sarcoma and other cancers.

Asked whether the program is a success, Toretsky said he believes an optimal outcome for a patient who is diagnosed with a life-threatening illness is that they’re able to return to the hopes and dreams and life plan they had when diagnosed after undergoing treatment.

“We’ve done something successfully when we’ve gotten the patient back on the track that they were going to pursue,” he said. “Sometimes they change direction, and we support that, as well. But the goal is to get them back into living a good life. And I think that all of the services we bring together can help patients do that. And they don’t always necessarily use all of them, but we provide what they need.”

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Two weeks after graduating college, Fauteux went to physician assistant school, and she’s now working as a physician assistant in Reston, focusing on spine surgery.

She believes the stars are aligned.

“In the sense that I’m able to take what I went through and really hope I can apply it to a lot of the patients and make my role as a health care practitioner that much more effective with the things I’ve learned over the years.”

Advocating for the survivorship program, Fauteux wants her story to inspire hope in cancer patients who may be discouraged.

“This really healthy, 20-year-old girl whose life flips upside down; she goes through all this trauma. And now she’s completely turned her life around; she has long hair, she has a great job and she’s now kind of giving back to the health care community as a PA. Of course, on paper, this all sounds absolutely amazing. And it seems almost easy,” Fauteux said.

But, Fauteux said it was the worst part of her life — feeling lost and alone in the beginning of her journey and even in the end. Yet, it’s also been the most amazing part of her life because it’s opened up so many doors and opportunities to perhaps help others with their journeys.

“Having somebody that has gone through it and has that hope and that story that was a success is, I think, really effective for those who are going through it and especially with the survivorship program. It highlights such an amazing positive aspect of post-treatment follow-up that makes it that much less intimidating to go through something like this, and I have a normal life now,” she said.

“I never imagined this day would actually be here five years ago, six years ago; it just it didn’t seem possible. But I hope that my story can really be that light that people might need in the moment where they’re feeling really, really desperate and fearful.”

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