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KENT, Ohio (AP) — Dustin Crum scored from the 1 on a misdirection play in overtime, and Montre Miller broke up a two-point conversion pass as Kent State held off Miami (Ohio) 48-47 on Saturday to earn a spot in the Mid-American Conference championship game.

The win, played in swirling snow flurries, lofted Kent State (7-5, 6-2) to the MAC East title and set up a tilt against West champion, Northern Illinois, Saturday in Detroit for the conference crown.

Crum threw for 325 yards and two touchdowns, Keshunn Abram had seven catches for 138 yards and a TD. Xavier Williams carried 13 times for 168 yards and two scores, Marquez Cooper added 128 yards rushing and a touchdown.

Brett Gabbert threw for 405 yards and four touchdowns for the RedHawks (6-6, 5-3) and lofted a pretty rainbow to Jalen Walker at the front of the end zone on Miami’s first play of overtime.

The RedHawks went for the win but Gabbert’s conversion pass to Walker was batted down by Miller.

___

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Louisiana: Conditions after Ida killed 280M fish inland

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Conditions after Hurricane Ida last summer killed about 280 million fish in inland waters — about 40% more than died in Louisiana waters after Hurricane Andrew in 1992, the state Department of Wildlife and Fisheries estimated Thursday.

Catchable fish are usually scarce for about a year in areas which had big fish kills, but populations rebound, the department said in a news release.

Most of those from Ida are in an area where the storm was moving slowly before it left the state, said Robby Maxwell, whose job as inland fisheries technical adviser includes being that division’s fish kill coordinator.

Hurricane Laura, which slammed into southwest Louisiana on Aug. 27, 2020, was the same magnitude as Ida but moved much faster and left a very different pattern, he noted.

“Instead of concentrated fish kills, they were scattered over 9 million acres,” he said. That’s about 14,000 square miles or 36,400 square kilometers.

Most of the fish died within a week of Ida’s Aug. 29 landfall, in an area covering about 2,800 square miles (7,200 square kilometers), the department said.

It said 19 of 20 big fish kills were in areas where hurricane-force winds roared through.

The kills are caused by low oxygen levels after tropical storm winds and storm surge churn up sediment and dump in debris, which uses oxygen as it decomposes.

There’s no way to get an exact number of fish killed, the department emphasized. It said the estimate was based on factors including wetland maps, the known extent of fish kills, historic sampling, and expert opinion about kills’ severity.

Wildlife and Fisheries logged information from staff observation, public phone calls and social media posts about 20 fish kills throughout southeast Louisiana.

One near Gibson — at the southwestern edge of its map — was the only one where winds were less than 74 mph (119 kph), Maxwell said.

At the northern end, “there was only one significantly above I-12, on a tributary of the Tangipahoa River,” he said.

Maxwell said Lake Maurepas drainages east and southeast of Baton Rouge had extensive kills, and there also were some reported around Houma and east to the Mississippi River, including New Orleans’ west bank — but not the city’s east bank or Lake Pontchartrain, its northern boundary.

In the months after a fish kill, surviving fish spread out into areas where they now have little predation or competition for increased nutrients. “The following spring, they will spawn with extremely high success rates,” the department said.

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